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Listen to me yap about the Caldwells for 45 minutes

December 4, 2020

Briefly: I wrote an article about the 25th anniversary of the Caldwell Catalog for the December issue of Sky & Telescope, and Frank Timmes of the American Astronomical Society interviewed me about it for the AAS YouTube channel. It was a fun interview and I’m grateful to Frank for his interest and for a fun conversation.

3 comments

  1. Another thing about Patrick Moore was is that his hand drawn maps of the Moon where so good that the USSR used them during their remote lunar probes visits there and they where translated into Russian.there’s a dark skies park named after Patrick called Moore’s Reserve which is the South Downs National Park which is north of Selsey and covers a large area.i can’t really comment on the sky quality there since my only stargazing was just in the national park on the eastern edge of Winchester at dusk and I was only packing my 5×10 Zeiss mini quick monocular, rather undergunned you might say!but better than nothing!,I did manage to get the phases of Venus and I think that it was February or March this year just before coronavirus shut down the world.i don’t know what happened to Patrick Moore’s house in Selsey,Far Things(might have been one word?)was the house’s name.


  2. Great S&T article, great interview. I especially enjoyed the rotting fishnet metaphor!


  3. Thanks for the comments. Kevan, you are correct about Moore’s moon maps having been used by the Russian space program. The US used them as well. I mentioned that briefly in the magazine article but not in the interview (I wasn’t avoiding it, we just didn’t spend much time on Sir Patrick’s history). Pretty cool stuff.

    Thanks, Bill, much appreciated! IIRC that metaphor is a hack of something from either Harry Harrison or Patrick F. McManus, talking about an old wooden bridge that mostly a collection of holes that were loosely defined and surrounded by a few rotting beams. I’ve been laughing about that since I was about 14.



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