Archive for February 5th, 2017

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Upgrading secondary collimation bolts on a reflector

February 5, 2017

dscn1615

Here’s a fast, cheap, and easy hack that I do to every reflector that passes through my hands. I hate messing around with hex wrenches while collimating my reflectors, so I replace the Allen bolts with standard hex-cap bolts that can be turned by hand and lightly tightened with a socket wrench or pliers.

I’ve done the mod to all three of the StarBlast 4.5s that the PVAA has placed with the Claremont Public Library – which I am responsible for servicing every couple of months – as well as to my XT10, my SkyScanner 100, London’s XT4.5, and the 5″ f/5 SkyWatcher Newt I had a few years ago. You’ll notice that so far, all of the scopes I’ve done this to have been Synta-made and Orion or SkyWatcher branded. All of the smaller ones have taken identical hardware, but I did the XT10 so long ago I don’t remember – I think it took longer and possibly larger-diameter bolts, but I could be talking crazy.

If this is something you’re interested in doing, you need to take two measurements, make a run to the hardware store, and do about five minutes of work when you get back home. Or you can get a set of Bob’s Knobs, which are much nicer and designed for no-tool use. But making your own with hex-cap bolts costs less than five bucks and gives passable results, and doesn’t stop you from picking up Bob’s Knobs later if you like.

The first thing you want to know, that you can only find out from your assembled spider/secondary mirror mount, is the length of bolt that you’ll need. The secondary holder has two parts, the hub that the spider attaches to, and the 45-degree-angled mirror holder that is usually attached to the back of the secondary mirror itself with double-sided tape. The collimation bolts engage with threads in the hub, and bear against the flat back surface of the mirror holder. The Allen bolts that the scopes ship with are much shorter than the distance from the mirror holder to the front of the hub. So collimation requires sticking a hex wrench down the hole blindly and fumbling a bit to get it seated in the socket (at least for me – if that doesn’t bother you, this post will probably not be of much use).

secondary-mirror-diagram

If you’re going to replace those little shorty Allen bolts with regular bolts, you need to know the distance from the mirror holder to the front of the hub – it’s the dimension between the dotted lines in this diagram, labeled “min. length for bolts”. Your replacement bolts need to have shafts at least this long, or their caps are going to run into the hub before they engage with the mirror holder. It doesn’t really matter how much longer they are, as long as it’s not ridiculous – you don’t want them sticking so far out of the front of the scope that they’ll catch on things or scatter light into the tube.

The second thing you need to know is the type of collimation bolt your scope has – its diameter and thread pitch. If you don’t know that, and you probably won’t the first time out, just back one (and only one!) of your Allen bolts all the way out, and take it with you to the hardware store.

metric-bolt-gauge

At the hardware store you’ll find a bolt gauge like this one. Actually you’ll probably find two, one for English hardware and one for metric. If you have a scope made in China, it probably uses metric hardware, so start there.

testing-original-bolt

Here’s a close-up of me testing one of the collimation bolts from the SkyScanner in the metric bolt gauge. As you can see, it fit the 4mm socket.

replacement-bolt-bag

I already knew from measuring the scope’s secondary that I needed bolts longer than 20mm. And here’s my part: a 4mm x 25mm (diameter x length) bolt, part #81494 at Orchard Supply and Hardware. I bought six – three for my SkyScanner 100, and three for London’s XT4.5, which I hadn’t done yet.

testing-replacement-bolt

My motto is “trust but verify”, especially before buying hardware. If unbagging a part to test it in the store makes you queasy, you can just push the end of one bolt through the bag, enough to try it on the bolt gauge. This won’t destroy the packaging should you need to put it back – buy it or leave it, you can poke the bolt back into the package and only leave a tiny hole (in this case, 4mm!).

original-allen-bolts

Here are the old bolts ready to go into the bag, which has all of the original Allen bolts from half a dozen reflectors now. I don’t know why I save them. I ‘m kind of an astro-hoarder. If anyone out there wants these, let me know and I’ll send them to you gratis.

Anyway, so far, so good. You get home, back out the Allen bolts, and replace them with the hex-cap bolts. Now, this is important: for your sanity, replace the bolts one at a time. If you screw all of the original Allen bolts out before putting in any of the replacements, your secondary is going to be flopping around uselessly. It may well rotate in place and end up not even facing the focuser drawtube. Take it from an idiot who has done this! But if you replace the bolts one at a time and get all of the replacements finger-tight, the mirror will maintain its radial orientation and may even stay in pretty good collimation through the procedure, although of course you’ll want to recheck and touch up the collimation when you’re finished.

There are loads of good sources on Newtonian collimation online so I’m not going to reinvent that particular wheel. I’ll just add a couple of tips that have made my life a lot easier. The first is to try to balance the push and pull on the three collimation bolts. In other words, if you want to screw in one bolt, back off another one first. If you only ever collimate by screwing in, you’re going to either run out of travel, jack up your mirror holder, or force it farther down the tube, depending on what the deal is with the mounting bolt (some are spring-loaded, some aren’t). When I sit down to collimate the secondary, I quickly go around to each bolt and turn it both ways, backing out first and then screwing in, to get a sense for what each bolt does.

The second tip is specific to these replacement hex-cap bolts on the Orion/Synta scopes that I own and service. Once I get the secondary collimation where I want it by tightening the bolts with my fingers, I go back around and give each one a small additional twist, maybe a sixth of a turn, with the little pliers I keep in my eyepiece box (see here). If I do this evenly to all three bolts, it doesn’t affect the collimation, and the extra bit of tightness helps the scope stay in collimation longer. That might no be needed or even helpful depending on how the mounting bolt engages the mirror holder. Play around with it and see what works for you.

Replacing these bolts was just one of half a dozen hacks I made to the SkyScanner 100. The rest will be covered in another post very soon. Until then, clear skies!