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Observing Report: Partial solar eclipse on Oct. 23, 2014

October 27, 2014

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Last Thursday afternoon I went to London’s school to show the eclipse to the students. I was rolling with the Astroscan-plus-Sun-Funnel combo, veteran of the 2012 annular eclipse and transit of Venus, and the GalileoScope that David DeLano built for me, now sporting a Baader solar film filter from AstroMediaShop.co.uk.

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The eclipse started here at 2:11 PM, Pacific Daylight Time.

2014-10-23 eclipse in filtered scope

I’m still struggling to get good digiscoping photos with the iPhone. This one, shot through the filtered GalileoScope, is the least wretched of the lot. The immense sunspot group is AR 2192, the largest seen in 24 years. At nearly the size of Jupiter, It was easily naked-eye visible with eclipse glasses. There’s a nice video of it from before the eclipse at APOD.

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Oh, I also passed out a lot of eclipse glasses. The best deal I have found on them is this pack of 30 for $33 from Amazon. Of that 30-pack, two got mailed off to relatives (along with our entire previous stash of eight), London and I each brought home a pair (London promptly disassembled his to see how they were put together–that’s my boy!), and the other 26 went home with other excited kids.

Incidentally, my favorite view of the eclipse was through the glasses, with no magnification. There is something awesome and terrible about watching another world come between you and sun, even partly.

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I wanted to do an activity with the kids so I brought a pack of index cards and had them make pinhole projectors. That succeeded beyond my wildest dreams. The kids were completely occupied for a solid 20 minutes, and we could do the projections indoors and save our UV exposure for the scopes (which I brought inside, of course–you don’t leave a solar scope set up and unattended).

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London’s school is Oakmont Elementary and ‘BLAST’ stands for Best Learning After School Time.

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We also looked at pinhole projections of the eclipse cast by trees.

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Just a bit after max eclipse, which was at 3:30.

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The last of the wine, at 4:40. Unless I get really rich in the next couple of years, rich enough to go on eclipse cruises, my next solar eclipse will be in August of 2017. A total solar eclipse will cut a path from the Pacific Northwest to the Southeast US. My tentative plan right now is to fly to Oklahoma, see the relatives, and then drive up to northern Kansas for the event. Kansas in August should be hot and sunny, and on the Great Plains you can usually see bad weather coming hundreds of miles off, which will let us adjust our targeting on the fly.

Eclipse story in Claremont Courier

A guy from the Claremont Courier came out to interview me and some teachers, parents, and kids. Thanks to the paper’s paywall, I haven’t seen any more of the story than this web preview, which at least features two of London’s best friends. If anyone out there has a hardcopy they’d be willing to scan or pass along, I’d be very grateful. Update Oct. 31: Whoops! The story wasn’t paywalled; it was unavailable because it wasn’t done. Here’s the full story, and here’s a post with a couple more eclipse shots.

All in all, I think about 90 people got to see the eclipse through my scopes. The kids were mesmerized–so were the adults, actually–and I was very, very happy. Can’t wait until the next one!

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6 comments

  1. […] I first blogged about last week’s partial solar eclipse, I mentioned that a reporter had come out from the […]


  2. […] near my house in Los Angeles, Southern California with Solar eclipse glasses. Here’s a video showing the partial solar eclipse happening over Los Angeles on May 20, 2012. […]


  3. […] The sun funnel worked well enough – I also used it for the annular eclipse in 2012 and the partial eclipse in 2014 – but the screen material degrades the resolution somewhat. Mercury is a lot smaller than Venus, […]


  4. […] rain – or ash – must fall, and I’ve been extremely fortunate. Two eclipses (2012, 2014), a Venus transit, and a Mercury transit in the last four years, and not one of them clouded out. […]


  5. […] A quick note for all eclipse observers, but especially those who haven’t been able to find eclipse glasses: here’s the #1 best eclipse activity for kids, and not bad for adults, either. Each person needs a stack of index cards and a push-pin or thumbtack. They can pick out their names or make little drawings by punching holes in one index card, then use that to project little crescent suns on the other index card. Safe, foolproof, can easily eat up an hour or more. Everyone should do this, and take pictures and post them. Pics attached here are from the 2014 partial eclipse (observing report here). […]


  6. […] to fly. My old Sun Funnel – veteran of the annular eclipse and Venus transit of 2012 and the partial eclipse of 2014 – was in storage in the garage. There was never really any question but what it would be […]



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