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Observing Report: a semi-cloudy night at Joshua Tree

October 8, 2012

My scope at Joshua Tree Saturday night. Clockwise around the scope are the bright star Capella just in front, the constellation Perseus (12:00), the Pleiades (2:00), the Hyades (V-shaped arrow of stars directly oppose Capella), and Jupiter (4:00). Photo by Kevin Zhao.

Saturday evening I was at Joshua Tree. My summer anatomy students invited London and me along to the Indian Cove campground. I didn’t have room in the car for the big gun so I took my 5” Mak, which is what it’s for—times when I need a decent amount of aperture in a small package. That was no loss: the sky was striped with high, thin clouds all night and never really cleared out. We got decent views of a few things, but the 10” would have been wasted. We used the Mak to look at the Double Cluster and Jupiter. In moments of steady seeing there were quite a few cloud belts showing, and all four Galilean moons were lined up on one side of the planet, which was pretty cool. London brought along his AstroScan and we used it to look at extended objects like the Pleiades and the Andromeda galaxy.

iPhone panorama by Chad Claus. Click for the big version!

The clouds might have made for lousy telescopic views but they made for gorgeous naked-eye skywatching. At sunset the whole sky was striped with light from one horizon to the other.

Here’s another view, actually taken by me for a change. This is the unprocessed raw image, direct from my Coolpix 4500.

Moon halo photo by Kevin Zhao. Jupiter is inside the ring at 1:00, and the Pleiades are outside at about the same angle.

When the moon rose around 11:30, it was surrounded by a ring of faint light. I thought it was a moonbow, but that’s something different. The ring we saw around the moon is called a 22-degree halo and apparently has no other or more poetic name. That’s a shame. In the early morning, when the moon had gotten well above the horizon, it was surrounded by a complete circular halo with radiating clouds on either side. That was worth the clouds. I’ve been under wonderfully clear desert skies many times, but I’ve never seen a moon halo quite like that. For once, I think the clouds were worth it.

Update: There wasn’t just a moon halo, there was also a sun halo Saturday afternoon. Agnes Kwon captured it in pixels. Witness:

Many thanks to Agnes, Chad, and Kevin for letting me illustrate my post with their awesome photos!

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