Archive for July 8th, 2012

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Guest post: A few thoughts about the Orion SkyScanner and other scopes, including the Bushnell Ares 5

July 8, 2012

Here’s the first guest post by frequent commenter and dedicated deep-sky observer Terry Nakazono. Actually “dedicated” is an appalling understatement, since Terry regularly challenges himself and his scopes by (1) observing faint deep-sky objects, mostly galaxies, (2) with small scopes he can carry on public transportation and by foot, (3) from light-polluted skies in and around Los Angeles. I’ve been looking forward to reading about Terry’s scopes and his observing techniques, so this guest post is most welcome–hopefully there will be more to follow.

I’ve been using the Orion SkyScanner the past 2 years for nearly all of my deep-sky observing needs because it’s so easy to transport and set up – crucial if you rely on public transport and your own two feet to get to darker sky sites. For a package weighing in at 6.2 lbs with scope and mount combined, 100mm of mirror is a lot of aperture.

Both scope and mount fits snugly in this Adidas Schmidt backpack. All that’s needed is a tripod to attach the mount to, and a solid Manfrotto weighing in at only 4.5 lbs. (but with a 15.5 lb. weight load capacity) provides a strong, stable support.

Factor in the eyepieces, star charts and other accessories, and you’re only transporting about 12-13 lbs. of equipment on your body. By comparison, the Orion StarBlast 4.5 weighs 13 lbs, while the Orion SkyQuest XT4.5 is 17.6 lbs. Both cost about twice as much ($199.99 and $239.99, respectively) as the SkyScanner ($109.99) and both add only 14mm of additional aperture to the mirror. As Joe Roberts says, you will not likely find a scope that will show more for the cost.

For deep-sky work, superb optics isn’t as critical compared to planetary and double star work, so a 100mm Newtonian reflector works well (for me). Despite not having a collimatable primary mirror, collimation can be achieved by center spotting the primary mirror and adjusting the tilt on the secondary with the help of a collimation cap, significantly improving the views of the planets and double stars as well as deep-sky objects.

Here, you can just see the notebook reinforcement ring I put on the center of the primary mirror; the secondary mirror is collimated by adjusting the three allen screws surrounding the main screw in the center of the secondary holder with an allen-head screwdriver.

Having said all that, I’m no longer wedded to the SkyScanner as my sole dark-sky instrument.

I now have an Orion shoulder bag that I can carry my Orion VersaGo II mount and Bushnell Ares 5 in.

I also have a Vixen Mini-Porta mount which will support my Celestron C90 Maksutov-Cassegrain (C90Mak, top) and Orion ShortTube 80-A (ST80A, bottom) telescopes. I just ordered a smaller Orion shoulder bag that will carry the aforementioned mount and one of these two scopes. These Orion bags are ergonomically well-designed and make it easy to carry both scope and mount over your shoulder without causing major strain.

I suspect that despite their better optics, both the C90Mak and the ST80A will not allow me to see “deeper” into space (i.e. detect fainter objects) than the SkyScanner. But I’ll need to perform a “shoot-out” between these scopes outside of light-polluted urban skies to confirm.

Right now, I see the collapsible tube Bushnell Ares 5 (BA5) as the scope that will eventually replace the SkyScanner as my deep-sky instrument once I’ve gone as far as I can with the latter. This is an F/5 130mm Newtonian which thanks to its unusual design, weighs only about 6.5 lbs. for the OTA. At only $164.99 (with no shipping or sales tax) from Optics Planet, this is probably the best scope deal in the country right now.

Here is the scope with the tube collapsed, mounted on an Orion VersaGo II (because of its bulkiness, I’ve discarded the 6.5 lb. tabletop mount that came with this scope).

And here is the scope with the tube extended all the way out.

I’ve created a light shroud made out of black felt to cover the open tube and protect it from the elements while observing.

In the limited amount of time I’ve used this scope in both light-polluted and semi-dark skies, I’ve had a tantalizing taste of what 130 mm. of light gathering power can show. In my light-polluted front driveway with direct vision, I was able to see the ring shape of M57 for the very first time, using only 65X magnification. With the 100mm SkyScanner, I can barely make out shading within the interior of the oval-shaped disk at 80X or more using averted vision in darker skies. Less than two months ago, I took my BA5 out to a semi-dark (orange-zone) site for the first time. M13 looked nothing like the views I saw through the SkyScanner – at 130X, this globular was just exploding with stars all over the place. Ditto for M5.

As Matt has shown us through his reports on using “Stubby Fats” in the desert, you can do some serious deep-sky observing with a 130 mm F/5 Newtonian in semi-dark or dark skies.

But the BA5 has to wait until I’ve exhausted all the possibilities of the 100mm F/4 SkyScanner.